Thursday, January 28, 2016

Be Afraid Be Very Afraid EDUC 8845 Module 3

Clay Shirky (2005) claims two hundred years of chaos followed the invention of the printing press. During this time people were trying to figure out how this new technology would affect the ability to collaborate among groups. Rheingold (2005) begins his presentation with the new story of collaboration among humans in order to get things done.  Shirky (2005) himself got his mermaid parade slideshow done through the collaborative platform of flickr.  I think it is evident that both men believe humans are driven to interact and work in groups.

Rheingold (2005) states, “from literate populations new forms of collective action emerge in spheres of knowledge, religion, and politics.” Driscoll (2005) says constructivism describes people acting to make sense of their surroundings. (p.387) Rheingold reminds us that since mastodons roamed the earth, people have formed groups to make sense of their surroundings and to get things done (like sharing a butchered mastodon).
New forms of wealth and new forms of collective action are enabled by new technologies. The printing press precipitated book publishing houses, book distributers, book stores, and authors. Many people have gotten wealthy from being literate in the written work, printing, spreading it, and selling it. One wonders what new form of wealth will be enabled by the new technologies we now have.  
In the atmosphere of open content and the effects of the long tail, Shirky (2005) makes it clear that wealth will not accumulate in institutions. In the Learning to Change-Changing to Learn video it is made clear that the new wealth will be the ability to use the new technologies to achieve the higher levels of the new Blooms Taxonomy. This fits with the constructivist theories we have explored but it also fits with the connectivism theory we have yet to explore.
Shirky used the collaborative platform flickr to make his mermaid slides. I decided I would too. Although I have never been to NECC, I created the Animoto you see with this post with a little help from my friends, on flickr.
References
Driscoll, M. P. (2005). Psychology of learning for instruction (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
Rheingold, H.  (2005, February). TEDTalks [Video Podcast]. Howard Rheingold on collaboration. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/howard_rheingold_on_collaboration.html
Shirky, C. (2005 July). TEDTalks [Video Podcast]. Clay Shirky on institutions vs. collaboration. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/clay_shirky_on_institutions_versus_collaboration.html


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This a reposting from a Learning Theory course I took at Walden.

 

5 comments:

Downes said...

Yeah - everyone who wants to lead, the first thing they say is that people naturally work in groups.

Because without groups, there's nothing to lead.

Richard said...

Lisa,

I agree with new technologies and new ideas bring about an evolution that we can only imagine how it will grow. But I still have trouble thinking idealistically in which the human nature to take rather than give.

The tragedy of the commons is a great example, and it is easy to see what not to do after the fact, but its hard to convince everyone that there is good in collaboration until we have better examples of this.

Kimberly Arlia said...

I think that sometimes it is after failing so miserably for so long that humans try another method. Man is considered the master hunter. Yet, when the animal being hunted is not more cunning - rather just too large - that man tries another method. To survive collaboration was a necessity. The same is true for many organizations today. To survive there must be concessions.

I do believe that humans have compassion and do want to collaborate but overtime competition has become ingrained and expected. To revert back to more social times requires action, thought, plans - and with technology it is easier to do so.

But it still leaves these nagging questions - doesn't technology also make it easier to be less civil? Technology has made warfare easier. So what really does inspire collaboration?

Kimberly Arlia

Kimberly Arlia said...

I think that sometimes it is after failing so miserably for so long that humans try another method. Man is considered the master hunter. Yet, when the animal being hunted is not more cunning - rather just too large - that man tries another method. To survive collaboration was a necessity. The same is true for many organizations today. To survive there must be concessions.

I do believe that humans have compassion and do want to collaborate but overtime competition has become ingrained and expected. To revert back to more social times requires action, thought, plans - and with technology it is easier to do so.

But it still leaves these nagging questions - doesn't technology also make it easier to be less civil? Technology has made warfare easier. So what really does inspire collaboration?

Kimberly Arlia

acoley said...

Lisa,
Could it be that people fear being alone and therefore operate in groups to tackle the unknown? A flag goes up when someone is seen and thought to be a loner. The automatic response is something is wrong with him or her. It is more natural to be in a group than to be by yourself in any society. We look to our comrads for support in good and bad situations and in today's society, we don't even have to be in the same city to experience that comraderie. Technology has brought that part of humanity to another level and Rheingold explains it well with the different examples of how collaboration has manifested itself throughout the years.