Sunday, February 5, 2012

Concept Map: Static versus Dynamic Technologies EDUC 8842 Module 5


On the static---dynamic continuum, with static being the display of fixed content and dynamic being interaction with fixed content, I believe I am on the dynamic end of the spectrum. Like Mike Smart says, each tool listed in the map can be used in different ways, so where particular tools should be placed depends on how the tool is being used. For example, a wiki page can contain content allowing no interaction. The same wiki page could allow comments on the discussion tab. The same wiki page can allow edits by wiki members, who build the content collaboratively.
Static webpages can be useful-they are essentially an organization’s digital storefront and help people decide if they want to find out more. Dynamic web content on the other hand is current information meant to draw people into the static web content to find out more. Both technologies have symbiotic functions. Like the Ying and the Yang, they complement each other.
Kieran Healy does not agree. He views static tools to be equivalent to textbooks and lists many dynamic technology tools, lauding their benefits. As McGreal and Elliott remind us, using the tools available on the internet can "expand our classrooms beyond school grounds" (2008, p.158). The available tools include static and dynamic technologies.
Reference
McGreal, R.M.,&Elliott, M.(2008). Technologies of online learning (e-learning). In T. Anderson (Ed.), The theory and practice of online learning (pp.143-165).Edmonton, AB: Athabasca University Press.

7 comments:

-M. Fuller said...

Lisa,

I completely agree with your view about the tool's location on the continuum being dependent on use. I like that your graphic shows them on the continuum, yet not defined as static or dynamic. I also find it interesting that users define into which of the three C's a tool falls. For example, you show Prezi as content, which I see as collaboration; Animoto on your image is considered collaborative, yet I put it in communication/content. Again, differences which depend on the user! You note several collaborative tools which I have never heard of and will have to check out - thanks!

jsherman said...

Lisa,

Very nice posting. Your graphic organizer is very extensive. I looked at it for a while trying to determine why you did not differentiate between static and dynamic. After reading your post I believe I get your rationale. You make an excellent point regarding the symbiotic nature of static and dynamic technologies. I particularly like your analogy of the static page as a store front used to allow "shoppers" to see if there is anything they want in the store.

brandi said...

I love your graphic organizer. It is very creative and visually inticing. You introduced a lot of different tools that I have not used before but I am excited to try them out!

Kasey Langston said...

Great graphic organizer. It has a great visual appeal and I was able to follow the trend. There are a couple of items on there that I have never heard about that I am going to inquire.

sue said...

lisa- thought I would take another look at your post and began to think....as you and Mark Smart state "it is how the tool is being used". I can see how that statement comes into play. Thanks for sharing that point. It answers alot of questions on why our community members put their tools in the categories that they did.

jachenevert said...

Lisa,

How are you? You provided a very good concept map. I agree with you, the two sides complement each other. One must have knowledge before understanding and application.

Respectfully,
jac

jachenevert said...

Lisa,
How are you? You provided a very good concept map. I agree with you, the two sides must complement each other. One must have knowledge before understanding and application.

Respectfully,
jac