Wednesday, October 3, 2007

Direct Instructional Model

I was trained to write lesson plans using the Madeline Hunter format. I have been recently informed I will be observed using this criteria. This worries me, because I do not use direct instruction in my classrooms.
I believe that knowledge is best constructed by the learner. Learners in our classrooms are not empty vessels for us to fill with knowledge. Yet whether I daily spell out objectives and formative assessments appear to mean more than whether students are capable at 21st century skills. I guess I will fail this too. I failed kindergarten - no, really I did!
What is important then and should there be a formalised, generalised, lesson plan format that we all must follow? I am much to chaotic to go for that. Our brains are too. Our brains are like jungles.....how could the best Hunter lesson plan impose order on that, let alone engage any brain? Kids power down to attend school as it is....
I may be knocking on your door looking for a hand out soon....
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2 comments:

kwhobbes said...

One wonders at show some of us ever were able to get into this to begin with. I'm not a Hunter lesson planner either. I like the big picture - end in sight but the road there is one with curves, hills, and many stops along the way. I keep the end in sight but the I try to let the students direct the way there. Sometimes I have to do some tour guiding but, usually, I find the students learn so much more by being able to explore the non-touristy areas and delve into the backstreets.
If you need something - just knock!

rbiche said...

How right you are. Kids do construct their own meaning, and they do power-down for school. Direct instruction is not differentiated and does not consider all the ways a learner can learn. Like every other instructional model, technique out there, it works for some and not for others. So much focus is put on ending up at a certain point. What is lost is that everyone starts from somewhere different. I emphasize to my students and their parents that it is more about getting there than arriving. And you know what, the parents always agree. The only place I run into opposition is in parts of the educational community. Why is this?